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  • Question 1 - Which tumour marker is associated with medullary carcinoma of thyroid? ...

    Correct

    • Which tumour marker is associated with medullary carcinoma of thyroid?

      Your Answer: Calcitonin

      Explanation:

      Medullary carcinoma of thyroid accounts for 3% of thyroid cancers. It arises from the parafollicular cells (C cells) of the thyroid gland that produce calcitonin. It is often familial and caused by mutation of ret proto-oncogene, but can occasionally be sporadic. The familial cases can also occur as part of MEN syndromes IIA and IIB. The high calcitonin leads to down-regulation of the receptors, which does not affect the calcium levels significantly. Medullary carcinoma of thyroid shows characteristic amyloid deposits that stain positively with Congo red. The initial presentation consists of an asymptomatic thyroid nodule. Many cases are diagnosed due to routine screening of relatives of patients with MEN IIA and IIB. Medullary carcinoma can also cause ectopic production of other hormones/peptides such as adrenocorticotrophic hormone, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, kallikreins and serotonin.

      Metastasis from medullary carcinoma spread via the lymphatics to cervical and mediastinal nodes, and can also affect the liver, lungs and bone. Diagnosis is by raised serum calcitonin levels. A provocative test with calcium (15 mg/kg intravenously over 4 hours) also aids in diagnosis by leading to excessive secretion of calcitonin. X-ray might also show dense, conglomerate calcification.

      CA-125 is frequently elevated in ovarian carcinomas. CA 15-3 is often associated with breast carcinomas. Alpha-fetoprotein is seen raised in hepatomas and gonadal tumours. Elevated HCG is associated with normal pregnancies, gonadal tumours, and choriocarcinomas. Thyroglobulin is used for surveillance in papillary carcinoma of thyroid. CA 19-9 is used in the management of pancreatic cancer.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Endocrine
      • Pathology
      8.5
      Seconds
  • Question 2 - The pudendal nerve is derived from? ...

    Correct

    • The pudendal nerve is derived from?

      Your Answer: S2, S3, S4

      Explanation:

      The pudendal nerve derives it’s fibres from the ventral branches of the second, third and fourth sacral nerves (S2,3,4)

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Anatomy
      • Pelvis
      3.4
      Seconds
  • Question 3 - While conducting a physical examination of a patient, the GP passed a finger...

    Correct

    • While conducting a physical examination of a patient, the GP passed a finger down the edge of the medial crus of the superficial inguinal ring and felt a bony prominence deep to the lateral edge of the spermatic cord. What was this bony prominence?

      Your Answer: Pubic tubercle

      Explanation:

      At the superficial inguinal ring, the pubic tubercle would be felt as a bony prominence lateral to the edge of the spermatic cord. This tubercle is the point of attachment of the inguinal ligament that makes up the floor of the inguinal canal.

      Pecten pubis is the ridge on the superior surface of the superior pubic ramus and the point of attachment of the pectineal ligament.

      The pubic symphysis is the joint between the two pubic bones and the iliopubic eminence is a bony process on the pubis found near the articulation of the pubis and the ilium.

      The iliopectineal line is formed by the arcuate line of the ilium and the pectineal line of the pubis. It is the line that marks the transition between the abdominal and pelvic cavity.

      The sacral promontory is found on the posterior wall of the pelvis and would not be felt through the inguinal ring.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Abdomen
      • Anatomy
      13.9
      Seconds
  • Question 4 - Which tumour occurs in young adults, affecting the epiphyses of the bones and...

    Incorrect

    • Which tumour occurs in young adults, affecting the epiphyses of the bones and sometimes extending to the soft tissues?

      Your Answer: Osteoid osteoma

      Correct Answer: Benign giant-cell tumour

      Explanation:

      Benign giant-cell tumours tend to affect adults in their twenties and thirties, occur in the epiphyses and can erode the bone and extend into the soft tissues. These tumours have a strong tendency to recur.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Orthopaedics
      • Pathology
      13.7
      Seconds
  • Question 5 - An X ray of a 60 year old male brought to the accident...

    Correct

    • An X ray of a 60 year old male brought to the accident and emergency following a fall down stairs shows a fractured olecranon process of the right ulna with the line of fracture passing through the superior surface, disrupting a muscle. Which among the following muscles was most likely injured?

      Your Answer: Triceps brachii

      Explanation:

      The superior surface of the olecranon process forms an attachment for the insertion of the triceps brachii on the posterior aspect. It also has a minor transverse groove for the attachment of part of the posterior ligament of the elbow on the anterior aspect.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Anatomy
      • Upper Limb
      18.9
      Seconds
  • Question 6 - For calculation of cardiac output by Fick's principle, which of the following vessels...

    Correct

    • For calculation of cardiac output by Fick's principle, which of the following vessels is the best source of venous blood to determine the arterial-to-venous oxygen tension difference?

      Your Answer: Pulmonary artery

      Explanation:

      Fick’s principle states that the total uptake (or release) of a substance by peripheral tissues is equal to the product of the blood flow to the peripheral tissues and the arterial– venous concentration difference (gradient) of the substance. It is used to measure the cardiac output, and the formula is Cardiac output = oxygen consumption divided by arteriovenous oxygen difference. Assuming there are no shunts across the pulmonary system, the pulmonary blood flow equals the systemic blood flow. The arterial and venous blood oxygen content is measured by sampling from the pulmonary artery (low oxygen content) and pulmonary vein (high oxygen content). Peripheral arterial blood is used as a surrogate for the pulmonary vein.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Cardiovascular
      • Physiology
      11.8
      Seconds
  • Question 7 - An organ transplant patient may be at risk of developing which type of...

    Incorrect

    • An organ transplant patient may be at risk of developing which type of cancer?

      Your Answer: Thyroid cancer

      Correct Answer: Skin cancer

      Explanation:

      The most common malignancies encountered in the post–solid organ transplant setting are non-melanoma skin cancers, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders and Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS). The pathogenesis of these tumours is likely related to the immunosuppressive drugs used post-transplantation and subsequent viral infection.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Neoplasia
      • Pathology
      14.6
      Seconds
  • Question 8 - Intravenous diazepam was administered to a man who was brought to the emergency...

    Correct

    • Intravenous diazepam was administered to a man who was brought to the emergency department with status epilepticus. He was administered 15 l/min oxygen via a reservoir bag mask. Blood investigations showed sodium = 140 mmol/l, potassium = 4 mmol/l and chloride = 98 mmol/l. His arterial blood gas analysis revealed pH 7.08, p(CO2)= 61.5 mmHg, p(O2) = 111 mmHg and standard bicarbonate = 17 mmol/l. This patient had:

      Your Answer: Mixed acidosis

      Explanation:

      Acidosis with high p(CO2) and low standard bicarbonate indicates mixed acidosis. Lower p(O2) is due to breathing of 70% oxygen. The prolonged seizures lead to lactic acidosis and the intravenous diazepam is responsible for the respiratory acidosis. Treatment includes airway manoeuvres and oxygen, assisted ventilation if needed, and treatment with fluids.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Physiology
      • Respiratory
      18.8
      Seconds
  • Question 9 - A 26-year-old female patient had the following blood report: RBC count =...

    Incorrect

    • A 26-year-old female patient had the following blood report: RBC count = 4. 0 × 106/μl, haematocrit = 27% and haemoglobin = 11 g/dl, mean corpuscular volume (MCV) = 90 fl, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) = 41 g/dl. Further examination of blood sample revealed increased osmotic fragility of the erythrocytes. Which of the following is the most likely cause of this patient’s findings?

      Your Answer: Thalassaemia

      Correct Answer: Spherocytosis

      Explanation:

      Spherocytes are small rounded RBCs. It is due to an inherited defect of the RBC cytoskeleton membrane tethering proteins. Membrane blebs form that are lost over time and cells become round instead of biconcave. As it is a normochromic anaemia, the MCV is normal. it is diagnosed by osmotic fragility test which reveals increased fragility in a hypotonic solution.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • General
      • Physiology
      11.6
      Seconds
  • Question 10 - The ostium of the maxillary sinus opens into which of the following structures?...

    Correct

    • The ostium of the maxillary sinus opens into which of the following structures?

      Your Answer: Middle meatus

      Explanation:

      The maxillary sinuses usually develop symmetrically. The maxillary sinus ostium drains into the infundibulum which joins the hiatus semilunaris and drains into the middle meatus.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Anatomy
      • Head & Neck
      7.2
      Seconds
  • Question 11 - During a procedure to treat an ulcer in the first part of the...

    Correct

    • During a procedure to treat an ulcer in the first part of the duodenum, the most appropriate site to make the incision on the anterior abdominal wall to approach this ulcer would be the:

      Your Answer: Epigastric region

      Explanation:

      The abdomen is divided into nine regions for descriptive purposes. The epigastric region contains the first part of the duodenum, part of the stomach, part of the liver and pancreas. This would be the region that the surgeon would need to enter to access the ulcer.

      The left inguinal region contains the sigmoid colon.

      The left lumbar region contains the descending colon and kidney.

      The right lumbar region contains the right kidney and descending colon.

      The right hypochondrial region contains part of the liver and gall bladder.

      The hypogastric region contains the urinary bladder and the rectum.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Abdomen
      • Anatomy
      10.4
      Seconds
  • Question 12 - What forms the pelvic diaphragm? ...

    Correct

    • What forms the pelvic diaphragm?

      Your Answer: Levator ani and coccygeus muscles

      Explanation:

      The pelvic diaphragm is formed by the levator ani and the coccygeus muscles. The levator ani forms the greater part of the pelvic floor supporting the viscera in the pelvic cavity.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Anatomy
      • Pelvis
      14.7
      Seconds
  • Question 13 - Where do the cells belonging to the mononuclear phagocyte system originate? ...

    Correct

    • Where do the cells belonging to the mononuclear phagocyte system originate?

      Your Answer: Bone marrow

      Explanation:

      The macrophage originates from a committed bone marrow stem cell. It is called the pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell. This differentiates into a monoblast and then into a promonocyte and finally matures into a monocyte. When called upon they leave the bone marrow and enter into the circulation. Upon entering the tissue they transform into macrophages. Tissue macrophages include: Kupffer cells (liver), alveolar macrophages (lung), osteoclasts (bone), Langerhans cells (skin), microglial cells (central nervous system), and possibly the dendritic immunocytes of the dermis, spleen and lymph nodes.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Inflammation & Immunology
      • Pathology
      6.9
      Seconds
  • Question 14 - A young girl injured her arm following a fall down the steps On...

    Correct

    • A young girl injured her arm following a fall down the steps On examination, it was found that her left proximal radioulnar joint had dislocated and the annular ligament was stretched. This will make which movement extremely painful?

      Your Answer: Supination

      Explanation:

      Supination is the rotation of the forearm so that the palm of the hand faces anteriorly. This is performed by the biceps brachii and supinator of the extensor muscles of the thumb. The opposite action of moving the palm from an anterior-facing position to a posterior-facing position is called pronation. Pronation is performed by the pronator teres and pronator quadratus.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Anatomy
      • Upper Limb
      62.3
      Seconds
  • Question 15 - Which muscle in the neck divides the neck into two large triangles? ...

    Correct

    • Which muscle in the neck divides the neck into two large triangles?

      Your Answer: Sternocleidomastoid

      Explanation:

      The sternocleidomastoid muscle is an important landmark in the neck as it divides the neck into two; anterior and posterior triangles. These triangles help in the location of the structures of the neck including the carotid artery, head and neck lymph nodes, accessory nerve and the brachial plexus. It originates from the manubrium and medial portion of the clavicle and inserts on the mastoid process of the temporal bone, superior nuchal line. The sternocleidomastoid receives blood supply from the occipital artery and the superior thyroid artery. It is innervated by the accessory nerve (motor) and cervical plexus (sensory).

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Anatomy
      • Head & Neck
      11.3
      Seconds
  • Question 16 - Cancer of the testis most likely metastases to which set of lymph nodes?...

    Incorrect

    • Cancer of the testis most likely metastases to which set of lymph nodes?

      Your Answer: Internal iliac

      Correct Answer: Aortic

      Explanation:

      The lymphatic drainage of an organ is related to its blood supply. The lymphatic drainage of the testis drains along the testicular artery to reach the lymph nodes along the aorta.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Endocrine
      • Pathology
      9.3
      Seconds
  • Question 17 - Which of the following cytokines produced by the T cell induce MHC-II proteins?...

    Incorrect

    • Which of the following cytokines produced by the T cell induce MHC-II proteins?

      Your Answer: Interleukin-1

      Correct Answer: γ-Interferon

      Explanation:

      Interferons elicit a non-specific antiviral activity by inducing specific RNA synthesis and expression of proteins in neighbouring cells. Common interferon inducers are viruses, double-stranded RNA and micro-organisms. INF-γ is produced mainly by CD4+, CD8+ T cells and less commonly by B cells and natural killer cells. INF-γ has antiviral and antiparasitic activity but its main biological activity appears to be immunomodulatory. Among its many functions are activation of macrophages and enhanced expression of MHC-II proteins or macrophages.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • General
      • Physiology
      6.8
      Seconds
  • Question 18 - A football player sustained an injury to his ankle. The wound went through...

    Incorrect

    • A football player sustained an injury to his ankle. The wound went through the skin, subcutaneous tissue and flexor retinaculum. Which other structure passing under the retinaculum may be injured?

      Your Answer: Anterior tibial artery

      Correct Answer: Tibial nerve

      Explanation:

      The flexor retinaculum is immediately posterior to the medial malleolus. The structures that pass under the flexor retinaculum from anterior to posterior are: tendon of the tibialis posterior, flexor digitorum longus, posterior tibial artery (and vein), tibial nerve and tendon of flexor hallucis longus. The tibial nerve is the only one which lies behind the flexor retinaculum.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Anatomy
      • Lower Limb
      14.2
      Seconds
  • Question 19 - During clinic, a medical student conducts a physical examination on a teenage boy...

    Correct

    • During clinic, a medical student conducts a physical examination on a teenage boy with a lump in the inguinal region. The lump is protruding from the superficial inguinal ring. The student correctly concluded that it was:

      Your Answer: Either a direct or an indirect inguinal hernia

      Explanation:

      It is not possible to tell if an inguinal hernia is direct or indirect just by palpating it. Despite the fact that indirect inguinal hernias commonly come out of the superficial inguinal ring to enter the scrotum, direct inguinal hernia might still do this.

      Femoral hernia goes through the femoral ring into the femoral canal (has nothing to do with the superficial inguinal ring).

      Superficial inguinal lymph nodes lie in the superficial fascia parallel to the inguinal ligament; it would therefore feel more superficial and would not be mistaken for a hernia protruding through the inguinal ring.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Abdomen
      • Anatomy
      17.7
      Seconds
  • Question 20 - The following organs would be expected to lie within the right lower quadrant...

    Incorrect

    • The following organs would be expected to lie within the right lower quadrant of the abdomen, assuming that the gastrointestinal tract is rotated normally:

      Your Answer: Descending colon and sigmoid colon

      Correct Answer: Distal jejunum, caecum, vermiform appendix

      Explanation:

      The abdomen is divided by theoretical anatomic lines into four quadrants. The median plane follows the linea alba and extends from the xiphoid process to the pubic symphysis and splits the abdomen in half. The transumbilical plane is a horizontal line that runs at the level of the umbilicus. This forms the upper right and left quadrants and the lower right and left quadrants. Structures in the right lower quadrant include: caecum, appendix, part of the small intestine, ascending colon, the right half of the female reproductive system, right ureter. Pain in this region is most commonly associated with appendicitis.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Abdomen
      • Anatomy
      16.8
      Seconds
  • Question 21 - Painful erections along with deviation of the penis to one side when erect...

    Correct

    • Painful erections along with deviation of the penis to one side when erect are seen in which of the following conditions?

      Your Answer: Peyronie’s disease

      Explanation:

      Peyronie’s disease leads to development of fibrous plaques in the penile soft tissue and occurs in 1% of men, most commonly affecting white males above 40 years age. It is a connective tissue disorder named after a French surgeon, François de la Peyronie who first described it. Symptoms include pain, hard lesions on the penis, abnormal curvature of erect penis, narrowing/shortening, painful sexual intercourse and in later stages, erectile dysfunction. 30% cases report fibrosis in other elastic tissues such as Dupuytren’s contractures of the hand. There is likely a genetic predisposition as increased incidence is noted among the male relatives of an affected individual.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Pathology
      • Urology
      6.3
      Seconds
  • Question 22 - During an appendicectomy in a 16 year old girl, the registrar initially did...

    Correct

    • During an appendicectomy in a 16 year old girl, the registrar initially did not find the appendix on entering the peritoneal cavity. She, however, remained calm as she knew she could find it by:

      Your Answer: Looking at the confluence of the taenia coli

      Explanation:

      The vermiform appendix arises from the apex of the caecum. Although it has a constant base, it can pass in one of several directions such as upward behind the caecum, to the left behind the ileum and mesentery or downward into the lesser pelvis. It is retained in place by a peritoneal fold, the mesoenteriole derived from the left leaf of the mesentery. Taenia coli meet at the appendix which is the terminal portion of the caecum. The appendix is below the ileocecal valve, not above. It is not near the right colic artery (which supplies the ascending colon). It would not be found by removing a layer of the jejuno-ileum and is not in the pelvic brim.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Abdomen
      • Anatomy
      16.3
      Seconds
  • Question 23 - What percentage of the cardiac output is delivered to the brain? ...

    Incorrect

    • What percentage of the cardiac output is delivered to the brain?

      Your Answer: 1%

      Correct Answer: 15%

      Explanation:

      Among all body organs, the brain is most susceptible to ischaemia. Comprising of only 2.5% of total body weight, the brain receives 15% of the cardiac output. Oxygen extraction is also higher with venous oxygen levels approximating 13 vol%, and arteriovenous oxygen difference of 7 vol%.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Cardiovascular
      • Physiology
      4
      Seconds
  • Question 24 - Prostatectomy carries a risk of loss of penile erection due to injury to...

    Correct

    • Prostatectomy carries a risk of loss of penile erection due to injury to the prostatic plexus responsible for an erection. From which nerves do these fibres originate?

      Your Answer: Pelvic splanchnics

      Explanation:

      Erection is a function of the parasympathetic nerves. Of the nerves listed, only the pelvic splanchnic nerves have parasympathetic fibres that innervate the smooth muscles and glands of the pelvic viscera.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Anatomy
      • Pelvis
      6
      Seconds
  • Question 25 - The muscle that stabilizes the stapes is innervated by which of the following...

    Incorrect

    • The muscle that stabilizes the stapes is innervated by which of the following nerves?

      Your Answer: Chorda tympani nerve

      Correct Answer: Facial nerve

      Explanation:

      The stapedius is the smallest skeletal muscle in the human body. At just over one millimetre in length, its purpose is to stabilize the smallest bone in the body, the stapes and is innervated by a branch of the facial nerve.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Anatomy
      • Head & Neck
      10.9
      Seconds
  • Question 26 - Infection to all of the following will lead to enlargement of the superficial...

    Correct

    • Infection to all of the following will lead to enlargement of the superficial inguinal lymph nodes, except for:

      Your Answer: Ampulla of the rectum

      Explanation:

      The superficial inguinal lymph nodes form a chain immediately below the inguinal ligament. They receive lymphatic supply from the skin of the penis, scrotum, perineum, buttock and abdominal wall below the level of the umbilicus.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Anatomy
      • Lower Limb
      15.2
      Seconds
  • Question 27 - An old man was diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma with axillary lymph node...

    Correct

    • An old man was diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma with axillary lymph node metastasis. The doctor said he will excise the tumour and remove all axillary lymph nodes medial to the edge of the pectoralis minor muscle. One of the following axillary lymph nodes won't be removed by this procedure. Which is it?

      Your Answer: Apical

      Explanation:

      The apical lymph node group won’t be removed which include 20 to 30 lymph nodes. They are grouped according to location. The lateral group, the anterior to pectoral group, the posterior or subscapular group, the central group, and the medial or apical group. The lateral, pectoral, and subscapular groups are found lateral to the pectoralis minor muscle. The central group is situated directly under that muscle. Thus, if all lymph nodes lateral to the medial edge of the pectoralis minor muscle are removed, all the above four groups will be removed. The apical group won’t be removed which is situated medial to the medial edge of the pectoralis minor muscle.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Anatomy
      • Upper Limb
      9.6
      Seconds
  • Question 28 - A patient who underwent emergency appendicectomy complains of having numbness (paraesthesia) of the...

    Correct

    • A patient who underwent emergency appendicectomy complains of having numbness (paraesthesia) of the skin at the pubic region. Which nerve was most likely injured in the operation?

      Your Answer: Iliohypogastric

      Explanation:

      The iliohypogastric nerve comes from L1 and emerges from the upper part of the lateral border of the psoas major. It then crosses obliquely in front of the quadratus lumborum to the iliac crest where it perforates the posterior part of transversus abdominis and divides between that muscle and the internal oblique into a lateral and an anterior cutaneous branch. This provides sensory innervation to the skin of the lower abdominal wall, upper hip and upper thigh.

      The genitofemoral nerve also comes from the lumbar plexus that innervates the skin of the anterior scrotum or labia majora and upper medial thigh.

      The subcostal nerve is the ventral primary ramus of T12 providing sensory innervation to the anterolateral abdominal wall in an area superior to the pubic region.

      A spinal nerve owing to their deep location would not have been injured in the procedure.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Abdomen
      • Anatomy
      10.6
      Seconds
  • Question 29 - A 7-year old child from a rural setting complains of recurrent abdominal pain....

    Incorrect

    • A 7-year old child from a rural setting complains of recurrent abdominal pain. The child is found to have a heavy parasitic infestation and anaemia. Which type of anaemia is most likely seen in this patient?

      Your Answer: Aplastic anaemia

      Correct Answer: Iron deficiency anaemia

      Explanation:

      The most common cause of iron deficiency anaemia in children in developing countries is parasitic infection (hookworm, amoebiasis, schistosomiasis and whipworm).

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Microbiology
      • Pathology
      31
      Seconds
  • Question 30 - Which of the following is the most accurate test for the diagnosis of...

    Incorrect

    • Which of the following is the most accurate test for the diagnosis of primary syphilis?

      Your Answer: ELISA performed on exudate or secretions

      Correct Answer: Dark-field microscopy

      Explanation:

      Primary syphilis is transmitted via sexual contact. Lesions on genitalia, called a chancre occur after an asymptomatic incubation period of 10-90 days (average 21 days) after exposure. This chancre is a typically solitary (can be multiple), firm, painless, ulceration over the skin at the point of exposure to spirochete, seen on penis, vagina or rectum. It heals spontaneously after 4-6 weeks. Local lymphadenopathy can be seen.

      Diagnosis is made by microscopy of fluid from lesion using dark-field illumination, taking care to not confuse with other treponemal disease. Screening tests include rapid plasma regain (RPR) and Venereal Diseases Research Laboratory (VDRL) tests. False positives are known to occur with these tests and can be seen in viral infections like hepatitis, varicella, Epstein-Barr virus, tuberculosis, lymphoma, pregnancy and IV drug use. More specific tests should therefore be carried out in case these screening tests are positive.

      The Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay (TPHA) and the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTAABS) test are based on monoclonal antibodies and immunofluorescence and are more specific. However, they can too show false positives with other treponemal diseases like yaws or pinta. Other confirmatory tests include those based on enzyme-linked immunoassays.

    • This question is part of the following fields:

      • Pathology
      • Urology
      10.5
      Seconds

SESSION STATS - PERFORMANCE PER SPECIALTY

Endocrine (1/2) 50%
Pathology (3/8) 38%
Anatomy (14/17) 82%
Pelvis (3/3) 100%
Abdomen (5/6) 83%
Orthopaedics (0/1) 0%
Upper Limb (3/3) 100%
Cardiovascular (1/2) 50%
Physiology (2/5) 40%
Neoplasia (0/1) 0%
Respiratory (1/1) 100%
General (0/2) 0%
Head & Neck (2/3) 67%
Inflammation & Immunology (1/1) 100%
Lower Limb (1/2) 50%
Urology (1/2) 50%
Microbiology (0/1) 0%
Passmed